Tag Archives: FOAMed

Keep it Cool with Frostbite

This week – the return of the King.  Sakib himself shares some information on appropriate care for frostbite injuries

Play it cool with frostbite

Quickhit:

–       Risk of cold injuries such as frostbite correlated with temperature, windchill, moisture

  • Risk is <5% when ambient temp (including wind chill) is >5 F (-15C)
  • Most often occur at ambient temp < -4 F (-20C)

–       Pathophys = freezing alone not sufficient to cause tissue death, Thawing contributing to endothelial damage is cause of majority of damage (see continue reading below)

–       Zone of injury = Zone of Coagulation, Zone of Hyperemia, Zone of Stasis

–       Treatment = Rapid re-warming with warm water. Do not debride any tissue initially.

–       Complications

  • 65% pt. experience sequeulae from their injuries
  • Hypersensitivity to cold, pain, ongoing numbness
  • Asthritis, bone deformities, dystrophia

Read below to get more thorough treatment maneuvers and further info on Frostbite Injury!

Continue reading

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eFAST – The Quick Hit

Everything you need to know about the eFAST in 60 seconds or less (120 seconds if you count the one minute ultrasound video).

Who Needs an eFAST Ultrasound:

  • Blunt and penetrating abdominal trauma
  • Blunt and penetrating chest trauma
  • Ectopic pregnancies
  • Any patient you suspect has abdominal or thoracic free fluid or bleeding

The Technique: 5 scans in 1 exam

Heart

  • Probe position: subxyphoid
  • Image: four chambers of the heart and pericardium
  • Evaluation for: pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade

Right Upper Quadrant (Perihepatic)

  • Probe position: RUQ
  • The image: Morrison’s Pouch (liver and kidney), diaphragm, and some chest
  • Evaluation for: intra-abdominal bleeding or fluid and hemothorax

 Left Upper Quadrant (Perisplenic)

  • Probe position: LUQ
  • The image: Spleen, kidney, diaphragm, and some chest
  • Evaluation for: intra-abdominal bleeding or fluid and hemothorax

Pelvis

  • Probe position: above the bladder
  • The image: in men- bladder and rectum, in women- bladder, uterus, and rectum
  • Evaluation for: intra-abdominal bleeding or fluid

Lungs

  • Probe position: anterior chest at the 3rd and 4th intercostal space
  • The image: ribs, pleura, and lung
  • Evaluation for: pneumothorax

eFAST 1 minute ultrasound

Submitter: Jennifer Cotton

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Life in the eFAST Lane: extended Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (Part 2)

 We’re back! Last time we reviewed eFAST basics and part of the eFAST technique. Hopefully you’ve been practicing the heart, RUQ, and LUQ scans like my friend below. So without further adieu…. I give you eFAST Part Deux!
Figure 1 - An eFAST Rockstar in Training

Figure 1 – An eFAST Rockstar in Training

How to Do I Do an eFAST? (Continued from Part 1)
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Life in the eFAST Lane: Extended Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (Part 1)

The Case: There are just too many eFAST cases to choose from. Which one to tell you…? Should I tell you about my first eFAST patient, the supposed-to-be-simple-but-really-wasn’t, on-coumadin guy who laid out his motorcycle? What about the lady from the rollover down a twenty foot embankment? Or the teenager from a horseback riding accident? Should I tell you about the night I hung out in resuscitation and did an eFAST on every patient that came through? A night in December I like to think of as Ultrasound Christmas. A night when a trauma alert rolled in and before I knew what was happening, the resident put the ultrasound probe in my hand and said “Go for it!” Needless to say it was AWESOME! Like do-a-secret-happy-dance-in-the-hallway-afterwards kind of awesome. I’m definitely still lovin’ the ultrasound elective, especially since I’ve become competent at eFASTs.

So what’s an eFAST you ask? It’s simple, really. It’s a systematic ultrasound scan to check for pneumothorax and free fluid (usually blood) in the abdomen and chest. It’s quick, easy, and incredibly useful. You don’t have to be a genius for this stuff. And it’s an ultrasound scan, so it means fewer patients being radiated by CT scans. Remember? Radiation bad. No radiation good. If you’re going to spend time in the ED, you should learn the eFAST. End of story. Plus if trauma’s your scene, you’ll get close to some wicked traumas. So now that you’re convinced… just how do you do an eFAST?

What’s eFAST All About?

The eFAST is a fast (pun intended) and easy way to check for blood in the chest and abdomen. eFAST is an acronym for extended Focused Abdominal Scan for Trauma. It’s an ultrasound exam designed for trauma patients that can be used at the bedside without interrupting ongoing care. Unstable patients with positive eFAST scans can then receive definitive care (get a chest tube, go to surgery, etc.) without the delay of waiting for a CT. The exam is a set of scans that quickly visualize free fluid (like blood) in the anatomical sites it most commonly collects, so the trick to quickly interpreting an eFAST exam is learning just where free fluid tends to collect. An eFAST looks at the right upper quadrant (RUQ), left upper quadrant (LUQ), pelvis, heart, and lungs. (Lungs are the extended part of the exam. Without the lung component it’s just called a FAST exam.) So that’s five ultrasound views, six if you’re picky about the whole 2 lungs thing, and you’ve completed an eFAST exam. It takes less than 5 minutes to complete, but more like 2 minutes as you approach ultrasound rock star status. Plus it’s more sensitive than x-ray for conditions like pneumo or hemothorax. Basically, eFASTs are a great ultrasound scan for rapidly identifying bleeding and other common injuries in the trauma patient.

The Patient: Who Gets an eFAST? 

  • Blunt and penetrating abdominal trauma
  • Blunt and penetrating chest trauma
  • Ectopic Pregnancies
  • Suspected abdominal or thoracic free fluid or active bleeding

How Do I perform an eFAST?

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It’s ALSO that time of year: Respiratory Syncytial Virus

Symptoms: Over 2 to 3 days development of wheezing, a so called “tight” wheezy cough, fever (usually low grade), cyanosis, tachypnea, retraction, fatigue.

Diagnosis:

Upon physical exam the above symptoms are noted, on auscultation inspiratory crackles and wheezing are usually present. Hydration status should be noted, as RSV is a diffuse small airway disease, leading to bronchiolitis.

Non-specific lab tests such as ABGs, CBC, and O2 sat., and age of child help determine candidates for admittance. Secretions can be analyzed using PCR but are expensive, a sophisticated virology lab is required in terms of antigen detection.

Imaging X-Ray is commonly ordered, revealing (nonspecific) hyperinflated lung fields, diffuse interstitial infiltrates, and in more advanced cases focal atelectasis.

DDx: Asthma, bronchitis, adenovirus, pneumonia, metapnuemovirus, influenza.

Treatment:  See part 2 coming soon!

Continue reading

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IT’S THAT TIME OF YEAR: FLU QUICKHITS (PART 2)

Part two will cover the important basics about the flu treatment, chemoprophylaxis, high risk patient population w/ the flu management. This is a compilation of information provided by the CDC along with reference papers that have been clinically relevant as they have been referenced multiple times over the last few weeks during my rotation in the ED. 

flu2

Note that Tamiflu is now FDA approved for patients age 2-weeks and older (FDA NEWS RELEASE link)

 

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Pregnant women

Oseltamivir is preferred for treatment of pregnant women. Pregnant women are recommended to receive the same antiviral dosing as nonpregnant persons

  • Zanamivir might be preferred by some providers because of its limited systemic absorption; however, respiratory complications that might be associated with zanamivir because of its inhaled route of administration need to be considered, especially in women at risk for respiratory problems
  • Pregnant women are known to be at higher risk for complications from infection with seasonal influenza viruses and severe disease among pregnant women was reported during past pandemics
  • Oseltamivir, zanamivir, rimantadine, and amantadine are “Pregnancy Category C” medications, indicating that data from clinical studies are not adequate to assess the safety of these medications for pregnant women

Persons w/ impaired renal function

Oseltamivir: For patients with creatinine clearance of 10–30 mL per minute, a reduction of the treatment dosage of oseltamivir to 75 mg once daily and in the chemoprophylaxis dosage to 75 mg every other day is recommended

  • Serum concentrations of oseltamivir carboxylate, the active metabolite of oseltamivir, increase with declining renal function.

Person w/ Immunosuppression

  • oseltamivir was safe and well tolerated when used during the control of an influenza outbreak among hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients living in a residential facility
  • Source: (retrospective study: Vu D, Peck AJ, Nichols WG, et al. Safety and tolerability of oseltamivir prophylaxis in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients: a retrospective casecontrol study. Clin Infect Dis 2007;45:187–93.)

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Continue reading

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It’s that time of year: Flu QuickHits (part 1)

Part one (written by second year Nick Mancuso) will cover the important basics about the flu epidemic this season. Great summary!

The 2012/13 vaccine contains the typical triad against an H1N1, H3N2, and an influenza B variant.

  • A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)-like virus
  • A/Victoria/361/2011 (H3N2)-like virus
  • B/Wisconsin/1/2010-like virus.

Symptoms overlap with many URI’s, however the classics:

Abrupt onset, Chills, Varying fever temps, Myalgias, Frontal/retro-orbital headache, Sore throat, Nausea/Vomiting

Diagnosis

can be difficult because samples are sent to labs and take time to get results. A nasopharyngeal culture is taken. Most diagnosis is done at the bedside based on clinical criteria. Rapid tests are not accurate and results vary. (Check continue reading for more info about diagnostic tests!)

Treatment:

Read part 2!

For some cool data and graphs from the CDC continue reading…

Continue reading

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Weekly Highlights

Hey everyone! With the large number of blogs (growing everyday), and the new emphasis toward #FOAMed, we decided to do a weekly post w/ highlights from around the interwebs. We tried to find a few that are still relavent at the med student level, and especially important as we slowly head toward the transition between medical student and residency.

We always have cool posts and interesting articles linked on our Twitter, so join us there too!

  • “Why are you ordering that test?” Asked by every attending when you present your plan and very important question to think about. [LINK = EM Res Podcast] 
  • Tweet pearls complied by the guys over at Academic Life in EM [LINK = AcademicLifeinEM] 
  • Study shows ED docs are as good as radiologists at gallbladder ultrasound. Learn from the pros at ultrasound podcast (and do forget to get their 1 min ultrasound app for you phone. One of the best resources for quick tips right before performing ultrasounds)
    [LINK = Ultrasoundpodcast] 
  • Speaking of ultrasound apps, check out Sonospot for a collection of websites and phone apps for bedside ultrasound [LINK = Sonospot]

  • MUST read before going into the ED (shadowing, rotation, for anything!). Initial assessment and management for trauma from Life in the Fast Lane [LINK = LITFL] 
  • Advice to new interns from Better in Emergency Medicine. Relevant for med students as well to see “The Ten Commandments of Emergency medicine” [LINK = Better in Emergency Medicine]

Check out these posts. Learn em well. Sound really smart. Come back for more post and links soon!

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